March 7th, 2014
New Spritz Technology Could “Change The Way We Read”
From Paste Magazine:

Technology’s changed the way we do almost everything. But whether you buy an ebook or read an article on the web, the format of reading itself is rooted in centuries-old, left-to-right, boring ol’ text. As methods for consuming music, television and games have shifted drastically, the way we read might also head down a new path.
The software is called Spritz, a tool developed for Samsung’s Galaxy S5 and Gear2 smartwatch. Spritz streams words individually rather than forcing your eyes to read horizontal rows of text. It works by using a red letter to pinpoint the eye’s “Optimal Recognition Point,” or the point where the eye can most easily recognize a word. From here, you can stream (and comprehend) words much faster than you’d imagine.
“As smart devices continue to change shape and become increasingly smaller, Spritz enables users to read comfortably and conveniently,” said Frank Waldman, the co-founder and chief executive officer of Spritz. “Our technology can be used to read emails, text messages, social media streams, maps or web content and can be integrated onto any mobile device—the options are almost limitless.”

What are your thoughts on Spritz?

New Spritz Technology Could “Change The Way We Read”

From Paste Magazine:

Technology’s changed the way we do almost everything. But whether you buy an ebook or read an article on the web, the format of reading itself is rooted in centuries-old, left-to-right, boring ol’ text. As methods for consuming music, television and games have shifted drastically, the way we read might also head down a new path.

The software is called Spritz, a tool developed for Samsung’s Galaxy S5 and Gear2 smartwatch. Spritz streams words individually rather than forcing your eyes to read horizontal rows of text. It works by using a red letter to pinpoint the eye’s “Optimal Recognition Point,” or the point where the eye can most easily recognize a word. From here, you can stream (and comprehend) words much faster than you’d imagine.

“As smart devices continue to change shape and become increasingly smaller, Spritz enables users to read comfortably and conveniently,” said Frank Waldman, the co-founder and chief executive officer of Spritz. “Our technology can be used to read emails, text messages, social media streams, maps or web content and can be integrated onto any mobile device—the options are almost limitless.”

What are your thoughts on Spritz?

March 7th, 2013

The Underground Library

From PSFK:

Here is an idea that we wish were more than just an idea: underground access to book samples while on the subway. Miami Ad School students Max Pilwat, Keri Tan and Ferdi Rodriguez, created this concept for a subway ad campaign to solve the problem of empty libraries and encourage reading.

Taking advantage of the fact that most people have smartphones, but they become relatively useless underground without any phone or internet signal, the concept uses near field communication (NFC) to make print ads for New York Public Libraries more interactive. The ads would link to popular books, of which the user can download a 10 page sample. Once done with the free sample, a pop-up message connects to the nearest public library to see if the book is available to check out.

It encourages people to read, gets them hooked on a really good book and provokes curiosity to want to get to the library to read the rest. 

February 20th, 2013

Why Libraries Should Be the Next Great Start-Up Incubators

Taken from The Atlantic:

Co-working spaces are often treated today as a novelty, as a thoroughly modern solution to the changing needs of a workforce now more loyal to their laptops than any long-term employers. But the idea is actually as old as the public library.

One of the world’s first and most famous libraries, in Alexandria, Egypt, was frequently home some 2,000 years ago to the self-starters and self-employed of that era. “When you look back in history, they had philosophers and mathematicians and all sorts of folks who would get together and solve the problems of their time,” says Tracy Lea, the venture manager with Arizona State University’s economic development and community engagement arm. “We kind of look at it as the first template for the university. They had lecture halls, gathering spaces. They had co-working spaces.”

Libraries also provide a perfect venue to expand the concept of start-up accelerators beyond the renovated warehouses and stylish offices of “innovation districts.” They offer a more familiar entry-point for potential entrepreneurs less likely to walk into a traditional start-up incubator. Public libraries long ago democratized access to knowledge; now they could do the same in a start-up economy.

Click here to read the rest of this story.

January 6th, 2012

We found a fascinating preview, from PC World, of this year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES) happening next week in Las Vegas. The annual technology trade show has become the world’s largest and one of the most regarded forecasts for tech trends of the coming year and beyond. Closed to the general public, CES regularly showcases cutting-edge product previews and major announcements from the world’s leading brands.

The headline for 2012 is unanimous: Mobile Technology Will Dominate Everything.

Insiders say that tablets will become significantly less expensive, laptops will get even thinner and cameras will become more like smartphones. Apps will be everywhere, including cars. And Microsoft’s phone-inspired Windows 8 will inch closer to release.

Broken down by category, here’s a summary of expert expectations for CES 2012:

  • Tablets | Looking for a flood of tablets, including some with budget prices. Also expect to hear some buzz about Windows 8 for tablets.
  • HDTVs | The HDTV industry will focus on improving the TV-watching experience, with less emphasis on improving the TVs themselves.
  • Laptops | Anticipate announcements of thin-and-light Ultrabook laptops equipped with Intel’s upcoming line of CPUs that promise improved graphics capabilities.
  • Smartphones | Hoping to see the first LTE Windows Phone for AT&T, or maybe a Sony Ericsson phone equipped with a 13-megapixel camera.
  • Cameras | Look for Wi-Fi-enabled imaging devices as camera manufacturers try to beat the competitive heat from smartphones. Also expect to see a lot of very small cameras with big optical-zoom ranges.
  • Desktop PCs | The biggest desktop PC news likely to come out of CES will involve the inclusion of “Ivy Bridge" CPUs, and the emergence of thinner, lighter all-in-one PCs.
  • Networking | We’re looking forward to demos of a new wireless standard that will mark the next step up from 802.11n.
  • Apps | Expect a deluge of apps, including some that will be available in new cars from Ford.

It’s an exciting time for technophiles — to think of this evolving world of connectivity, ripe with new gadgets and new possibilities. It’s similarly exciting to consider technology’s interactive impact upon libraries. Here at CPL, however, we know that it can be a daunting time for those struggling to keep up with it all. Sometimes even starting out can be overwhelming.

Which is why we’re inviting you to take full advantage of our free CyberNavigators program! Our experts will help you unlock an intuitive understanding and how to make the most of our rich technology resources. We’re offering both small group classes and one-on-one sessions at 44 Chicago Public Library locations throughout the city. The individual sessions, which run about an hour, are by appointment only.

CyberNavigators will help you effortlessly gain a great grasp of:

  • Computer basics
  • Email basics
  • Internet basics
  • Online job searching and resume writing
  • Online research methods
  • How to use the Chicago Public Library website, including account information and renewing materials

View our upcoming calendar of CyberNavigator events and workshops. And check out the regularly scheduled CyberNavigator hours at participating CPL branches.

CyberNavigators at the Chicago Public Library is funded by generous grants through the Chicago Public Library Foundation. Funding partners include: Bank of America, Wal-Mart, McCormick Foundation, Polk Bros. Foundation, Comer Foundation, Chicago Blackhawks and other individual donors.

The first step to making sense of it all is just a click away!

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